Woodsaw 3D Printed Parts

Miter Saw Zero Clearance Insert

Sawing with a tight fitting insert is almost always the right way to go.  It supports the wood being cut and prevents the fibers from getting torn as the saw teeth punches through.  The plate that comes with the saw works, but has a wide gap.  I made a thin plywood insert, but they don’t last that long.  This is my attempt at a 3D printed one.  The original is on the right.  Notice how wide the saw blade gap is.  I took a picture of the original saw plate on one of those self healing cutting mats.  They have good ruled lines in both directions to make sure the image didn’t get distorted.

The first print out of the gate fit really well.

 

20170805_130315

I made the first cut with no wood in the way.  It chopped right through the plastic and cut a self fitting slot that is just exactly the size of the blade.  I might have been a little too cautious.  Slow cutting built heat and there was a bit of plastic fuzz at the top edges of the cut.  A little light work with a utility knife had those cleaned up.  Some subsequent cuts have shown the insert to properly back the cuts.

I still need to find a spool of Dewalt yellow filament.

Table Saw Organizers

I am in a near constant state of looking for pencils and rulers/tape measures.  I should attach one of each to my body with a short retractable cable.  Until then I try to stage as many as possible at each work station.  At my table saw I made two different organizers to hold commonly used  items.  They both attach to the far side of my rip fence.

The white organizer holds my wooden ruler and a small stack of pencils.  The pencil well could have been a touch deeper, but otherwise it works well.  The yellow holder area keeps my grrripper push block.  It is at a really convenient hand position for quick use when sawing.

DSC_0927

DSC_0928

Drill Caddy

I am in a caddy mood for some reason.  Having organized grab and go tool sets make life easier when you have a problem to solve somewhere.  Most repairs don’t happen within arms reach of the tool box.

Up next is this zazzy little 12V drill driver.  It is small and highly controllable.  I like it for use as an electric screwdriver for assembly/disassembly and for installing small and delicate hardware in wood.  First you need a holster.  I did some careful measurements and in just 1 iteration came up with this design.  It is easy to insert and holds really well even through heavy shaking.  The key was how it catches on the pull out chuck.  A rounded leadin helps it find hold, but a square edge keeps it from erroneously falling.

DSC_0911

I attached this to a piece of wood and started carving off a handle area at the bandsaw to give more finger room.  This needs to be the most accessible thing on this caddy.

DSC_0912

With the gun set in place I could start planning out other accessories.  satisfied I had enough room everything got a coat of paint.  My blue was running out so it is a little spotty of a job.  Once everything gets installed I doubt it will be noticeable.  It would be great to buy Bosch blue and Dewalt yellow filaments and paints.  I bet a lot of effort goes into picking the colors for tool companies, and they don’t want to give those away.  Plus I have way too many paints and filaments, I need to use my current stash.

DSC_0913

I had a pretty good idea at this point where I wanted everything from the layout stage.  The only change was the addition of the bottom blue short bit holder.  I was running out of “wall” space and realized that would be perfect.  The nut drivers came with an odd loop on the holder.  It made building a little slide on clip easy.  The red case is full of a zillion standard and security bits.  No hardware is safe from me!

The handle is a copy of the previous design with a switch to red to keep with this color scheme.  The kobalt set has some decent quality standard bits, sockets, and a basic assortment of drill bits with hex shanks.  I don’t plan on doing much drilling with this, but occasionally they might come in handy.  Ok, what needs fixing?

The only thing this might need is a removable magnetic parts tray.  Maybe a clever, secure yet removable, design will hit me in the shower.

Zip Tie Caddy

Zip ties are one of those magical inventions that are simple genius, and I can’t live without them.  I have a fancy zip tie gun at work that does a really good job of tensioning the tie, automatically cutting at a set point, and keeping the tail captured.  They are expensive, so I found a different design that works pretty well and is affordable by mere mortals.  This calls for a custom caddy to keep all my zip ties organized and ready to go.

I cut up some spare plywood and played around with layouts a bit.  I think this is a good size.DSC_0899

I cut out a window to make tool access easier.

dsc_0900.jpg

I cut some more wood for a small base.  Narrow enough to make storage easier, but wide enough to keep it from tipping.  I really like how the rounded corners turned out from my router jig.

DSC_0905

I gave the two pieces a good painting and assembled.  I picked the color scheme of the zip tie tool.  The black zip ties contrast nicely against the orange background.

DSC_0906

To attach each zip tie bundle I used a zip tie that can be screwed down.  That looped into a zip tie around the bundle.  As you pull ties out you just tighten the bundle to keep things tight.

DSC_0907

It holds a variety of lengths and sizes along with my colorful re-useable ties and the screw down ones.  Plenty of room to grow too.

The handle was printed to match my hand size and keep with the color scheme.  Same deal with the zip tie tool holder.

DSC_0910

Corner Radius Routing Jig

Two hobbies collide as I print something super nifty for my wood habits.  A cool thing you can do with router tables is apply a template onto wood, and use a templating bit to match cut.  The bit has a bearing of the same diameter as the cutting edges.  It rides against your template and cuts away any underlying wood that isn’t shaped like your template.  Super handy, but you need a good template to start with.  Enter the 3D printer.

I modeled up this little jig so that it hooks onto the edges of a board and gives an exact radius.  It is hard to see given the color, but I printed a 1″ text in the bottom to note the size of the radius.

20170716_205631

Here is a picture of the jig fully seated, and what the resulting cut looks like.  Very clean and smooth.  The large circular cutout gives a lot of finger purchase so you can hold it tight and far away from the spinning bit.

One concern I had was with the material.  Would the cutting friction heat up enough to melt the plastic.  I did 4 cuts on a 3/4″ bit of plywood and everything looked good.  If I had a hundred corners to do, I would worry.  I could always upgrade to PETG.

The part is available in multiple sizes on thingiverse

Battery Charging Station

I am mildly obsessed with flashlights.  These flashlights take fancy 18650 lithium ion batteries that can be recharged.  I have a lot of light accessories, spare batteries from laptops, and other things that need storage and organization.  Similarly cameras tend to have their own specialized batteries that need storage and charging.  I built a flexible station to hold all my chargers in one place.  Later I added an extras organizer from a repurposed storage box.

I started with all the specialized chargers I could find.  Two for flashlight batteries and two for cameras.  I decided to go for the pedal board route.  Guitarists can have a lot of effects pedals for their instruments.  Instead of having them all splayed across the floor they tend to put them on a thin box using velcro.  The box has slits that allow cables to pass inside the box out of the way.

DSC_0813

I built it to fit a shelf in my office closet and made it wide enough to expand with new charger capacity if need be.  Nothing special, just some pine I had hanging out.  The chargers are held at about a 60 degree angle, and there is space in the back to strap down a power strip.

DSC_0814

I wanted it dark to help hide the dark cables and velcro.  I never have good luck staining pine, but mixed up a water based dye blend.  It turned out great!

DSC_0816

With velcro and power strip in place I could start attaching chargers.

DSC_0817

DSC_0818

A 4×1 outlet extender lets you plug in chargers that are supposed to go directly into a wall outlet.  I added a device called a blackout buddy.  Eaton makes them and they are red cross branded.  It plugs in and charges itself.  When the power goes out it turn on the light so can see.  Now when our power goes out I can find my way to the flashlight stash in the dark.  It fit like a charm on the shelf in my closet.

DSC_0819


Next up I pulled an old drawer storage box thing out of the trash.  It used to have board games in it, but was destined for the dump.  I thought the all-wood construction it was worth saving.  After re-gluing a few bad joints it was in good shape.

20170512_191052

The bottom drawer houses all the extra batteries I had from laptop pulls and random purchases.  I printed a number of organizers to keep them from touching.  Every organizer positively holds the battery in place so they can’t come out and can’t touch each other.  Keeping them from touching is an important part of preventing battery damage and fires.  Plenty of room left to store more batteries.

The middle drawer has random flashlight stuff.  O-rings, manuals, cases, etc.  I printed some dividers to hot glue down to keep the drawer from being a mess every time you open and close the drawer.

DSC_0823

Lastly I threw some of my DSLR gear in the top drawer because I never really had a good place for it.  3D printing and woodworking come together to help organize and support my camera and flashlight fixations.  What a gorgeous synergy!

DSC_0824

 

Sharpening Station

Sharpening is one of those things that you know you should do often, but always gets put off.  It is often said 90% of your problems with hand tools can be fixed by proper sharpening.  I am getting better at free hand sharpening, and getting less lazy over time.  It is hard to always have some dedicated space to sharpening though.  I read an article in Fine Woodworking Magazine where someone suggested using a basic tool box plus custom top as a sharpening station.  It is portable to follow you around the shop, and has all the right stuff where you need it.  Instead of buying something I decided to stash bust and build one.

I have a ton of 3/4″ plywood around from my temporary kitchen counter tops, and some left over spares from the cabinet installation.  I turned them into a 16×16 open fronted box, along with a few drawers.

Given that the case and drawers would be short I didn’t want to use my normal method of attachment.  This typically involves building the drawer to just below the inside width of the box, and using pine as runners.  It is quick and easy, but the drawers fall out if you pull too far.  Instead I went with metal slides, and got to use my new drawer install tools.

I picked up a slide install tool and drawer guides from rockler.  They help a lot, but are a little awkward to use.  I wish I had do more research before buying.  I think kreg might have a better system.

Instead of using some kind of gripy surface to hold all the various plates and stones in place I went with a small vise.

On the left is a small work surface with bench dog clamps to help hold sharpening plates.  It is offset to the left to prevent drawer interference.  On the right is a small granite surface plate I had.  I added a protective cover to it eventually (seen in later photos).  Now I can use whatever method of hand sharpening best fits the situation of the tool.

DSC_0795

I built 3 sets of drawers to start with because it was all I thought I would need.  Then I found enough stuff to add a 4th drawer.  Once that was built and installed I found enough for a 5th.  I probably have too much sharpening junk.

The project ended up stretching out over a month as I worked on other things and came back with more ideas.  In that time I used a few different pieces of plywood for the front face of the drawers, so they don’t match well.  I did cook up a cool side caddy for honing fluids though.

DSC_0801

In all I think I am going to like it.  It rolls nicely, tucks away under one of my other benches that didn’t have a use for that space, holds a lot of stuff in the drawers, and even has space on the bottom shelf for my work sharp tool box and saw sharpening clamp.  The only thing it might need is weight in the bottom to help with stability.  Now I have no excuse not to sharpen early and often.

DSC_0794

Sharpening Plates

There is a sharpening system known as scary sharp.  It typically involves adhering sand paper down to glass plates.  Start at a high grit, and sharpen your tool down through the grits.  It is perfectly valid, and can give you a great edge.  The only issue is the cost of sandpaper adds up.

If you only have a few tools to sharpen, it works great.  Sometimes you want to clean up a really rough ebay tool, and don’t want to use a nice diamond stone on a rusty hulk.  Flattening water stones is rough work, and best done with disposable sand paper.  They can help flatten issues on cast iron tables.  Basically lots of good uses.

I have some decent diamond stones, but still wanted some glass plates to do occasional sharpening and clean up with sand paper.  I went to a local glass company and told them I wanted 1/4″ 4×10″ float glass for this purpose.  I ended up paying 50 bucks for 9 plates.  The edges are a little rough, but not sharp.  Just not pretty.  They even put nice little square foam pads as feet.

20170416_093116.jpg

I am tickled pink at how nice and affordable these were.  I don’t plan on using them a lot, but at the price I got how could I not go for a pile?  This is probably a stash beyond life expectancy!  I would urge woodworkers and tool users that need to sharpen flat objects to go to their local glass shop and see what they can do.  A little super 77 spray adhesive to stick the paper down, and a sharpie, and you are in business.