Drawer Dividers

While the cabinets were being installed I was hard at work making accessories for the drawers.  Most commercially available drawer dividers had a few strikes against them.  They were either plastic or bamboo (doesn’t match my maple cabinets), they weren’t very adjustable, and most don’t fit the narrow drawers next to my stove.  So I made my own.  The first trick is to take two thick boards and make four thin boards.

I resawed (cut standing on edge in the bandsaw) these two 3/4″ maple boards to make four slightly undersized 3/8″ boards.  After a few trips through the planer to clean up all the heavy bandsaw marks they were all about 1/4″.

I could have tried to glue various thin pieces together to make dividers, but wanted to include 1/4″ plywood as a bottom.  It would make the thin dividers a lot stronger to glue along those long edges.  I pulled out some silverware and got to settings sizes.

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Every edge got a few swipes from my lovely little lee neilson tiny block plane.  That thing is perfect for knocking down sharp corners.  Once I had all the dividers in place for a particular drawer I applied expert and professional clamps until the glue dried.

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Drawers full of spatulas and cooking spoons needed backup in the rear to keep them from leaning, so I used a short segment to shore them up.

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I had planned to divide out our junk drawer and a drawer full of odds and ends, but that doesn’t appear to be feasible.  Entropy will reign supreme in those drawers for the time being.  I did however get all the heavy use drawers near the stove well organized.


dsc_0683As a bonus I had extra thin cut maple left over.  I want to use this stuff up quickly.  At these sizes and with it being flat sawn, it will cup and bow quickly.  At work we stretch regularly using a deck of cards with different stretch moves.  The box the cards came in was complete junk.  I thought having a two sided card caddy would make transport and use easier.

The cards are in a tray at an angle to keep them from falling out when carried.  As you do a stretch the card moves from the face down side to the face up side.  Eventually you get through all the stretches, shuffle everything and start over.

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I took this as an opportunity to try two new things.  The first was liquid hide glue.  I have been hearing a lot about this (very old) product recently.  Long working time, reversible and low visibility under finishes made me very interested.  It was a fine glue, I will be using it more.  The next was my  new pin nailer.  It worked miracles on my quarter round baseboard molding and did a great job sneaking pins into this thin stock.  The pin heads are only somewhat visible on the flat sides.  It wasn’t the best usage case, but I like them a lot.  They kept it clamped and are much lower profile than brad nails.

Printer Rebirth

After months of being without a printer since the breakdown, I am back in business!

It lives again!

A post shared by Chase (@kiltedcraftworks) on

dsc_0665I was 99% sure that all it really needed was a new hot end.  Not sure what happened to the last one, but it would jam up no matter what I did.  Monoprice of course doesn’t sell new ones, and I didn’t want some cheap knock-off.  I didn’t realize it when I first had this problem, but it turns out E3D makes a “lite6” version of their famed V6 for half the price.  It can only do PLA and ABS, but that is all I ever wanted anyways.  Step one, remove old hot end with extreme prejudice.

I was able to reuse the heating element from the old system, but the thermistor is new.  This setup doesn’t have any part cooling fans so I bet the overhang performance will suffer dramatically, but at least it should work.

Some things that aren’t working out for me are power.  The old fan was 5V and got modulated by the micro-controller to change speeds for variable part cooling.  The new one is 12V and needs to be on all the time.  After some frustrating work with non-standard connectors, I ended up cutting out their connectors and directly wiring the given 12V supply to the machine with a power tap off for the hot end fan.  The fan power runs up the back, and the old 5V fan power just hangs out front.  I might use it to add a part cooling fan someday.

I learned a lot about how hot ends are made, and ended up having to completely replace the tubing on mine to get a full range of motion.  It is one ugly critter now.

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Ugly, but working!  I made a few of these small 1/4″-20 nuts as test pieces, and they turned out all right.  This wounded beast should keep me going till I can get something better and more permanent.  No more trying to print 24/7 now, just the things that I really want… This might be harder than no printer at all!

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Kitchen Renovation Part 2

Welcome to Kitchen Base Camp Charlie.  It is starting to really look like something now!  The cabinets were not installed by me, so I can’t take any credit there.  I did install the lovely plywood countertops though.  The real countertop guy isn’t going to show up for weeks, so we had to make due.

There was always a light over the sink, but I tied in two more lights under the cabinets that flank the sink so they are all on the same switch.  Very bright now!

Similarly I ran wiring so the two lights over the microwave are tied in with the pantry and lights over the stove.  Now, with the switch for the stove and the one by the sink you have a considerable amount of kitchen lighting without even going to the main overhead lights.  It is a nice place to be with a lot more storage than before.  I’ll let the pictures do the rest of the talking.

Bunny Feeding Fix

Our rabbits are many things, and one of them is tenacious when it comes to food and treats.  We got them an automatic feeder to make sure they get pellets at the same time every morning.  Honey found she could chew, claw, dig, and ram the feeder to get more.  Screwing it all down to a wooden base made tipping harder, but didn’t stop the chewing.

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I needed to remove their access to the device.  Listening to Honey claw and dig at the bowl for hours on end is getting old.  I ditched the old bowl and used a 4″ to 2″ PVC coupling as a funnel.

I mounted it with some small screws run in through the side.  I can remove it and make repairs or changes if need be.  The dispenser sits over it nicely and is held in place with a few low cleats.  They keep it from shifting, but you can pick it right up if adjustments are needed.

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dsc_0649Next a length of pipe acted as a down spout.  I start with only this downspout, but the pellets came out too quickly from the drop.  They would hit the bowl and go everywhere.  The bunnies didn’t mind the game of 52 pellet pickup, but some pellets would escape the fence.

A few elbows helped slow everything down.  They have enough velocity coming down the chute to not get stuck in the first one, but aren’t going so fast to scatter all over when they hit the bowl.

The whole contraption sits nicely on the bun-servation tower, and a few screws ensures they can’t knock it down on themselves.  It has been a week and the silence is golden.  The furry raptors don’t seem to mind the change, they get food all the same.  Now they just don’t short tomorrow’s meal by shaking it out early.

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Kitchen Renovation Part 1

After a lot of early salvos, the kitchen war has finally begun.  First, let’s look in horror and disgust at the kitchen that was.  Painted 1980s particle board cabinets with rotted bottoms, dark blue peeling paint, and no flooring.  Not a pretty set of pictures.

Don’t look too long, you will hurt your eyes.  Granted the next set of images aren’t that much better.  I happily smashed cut and dragged out all the old cabinets, and peeled the various paint layers off.  At least it looks a lot brighter in there.

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Most of the kitchen stuff and appliances had to be spirited away to back rooms and the porch.  What was left was the bare essentials.  I call it Kitchen Base Camp Alpha.

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Next came the sanding of texture.  When the house was built, some kind of roll on orange peel texture was used.  In decades since installation it has turned to powder and sluffs off in chunks.  Every square inch of wall had to be sanded back to the drywall.  It was messy business.

Next came patching of various issue areas, priming, more patching of missed issues, and then two rounds of the brilliant blue/green color that was in the living room.

At this point I got a lot of plumbing and electrical fixtures changed, and even a bit of routing done to account for changes in cabinet location.  With the walls complete I could scrape the floor of any glues or gunks and get to tiling.  As usual odd walls and squareness issues confounded me, but I was able to stitch it together pretty well with the existing living room tile I did last Christmas break.

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dsc_0638I could now work on the small pantry without any fear of getting in the way of cabinet installation.  It would give us a place to put back some of our boxed junk and help out in minor cooking adventures at Kitchen Base Camp.  I went with adjustable wire shelves and wired an under-cabinet light in the top that goes on with the lights over the stove.  Some basic molding happened on the inside, but most will wait till I can do everything after the cabinets are complete.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Until the cabinets get installed we got to move a few essentials back into the new area.  I call it Kitchen Base Camp Beta.

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