Rotted Back Door

One of the lingering repair issues on our new house was a rotted back door jamb. It is on the porch well under the roof line. A thing I noticed though is that when it rains really hard the gutters over flow and water backs up to this door on the pool deck.

This showed up on the home inspection. I probably shouldn’t have let it go this long, but what can I say? I started chiseling away at the rot and found it was pretty heavy down low, but didn’t go too far up. The 2x4s in the walls ok. They must have some kind of treatment to help prevent rot.

Once I was done putting out the rotted stuff I squared everything up so I could start putting new material back in.

I went with a foundation of pressure treated wood with PVC wood on the outside. The thicknesses didn’t all match up in places. I don’t really care that much, this will definitely not rot.

I did some heavy calking to fill all gaps and painting to keep the wood that is left in good shape. A lot of the door seal is missing at the bottom, but I haven’t seen anything splash against this door, just the rising tide of rainwater backing up. The closet is not under AC, so the seal wouldn’t matter for that either.


I fixed the door rot, but really the root problem is water backing up on the porch. I fixed the door 2 months ago, and it took me working off and on all that time to fully address every aspect of the problem.

First off, the gutters often fill with leaf debris which causes them to backup and overflow on the porch. I have been keeping the gutters clear, but still get overflow sometimes. As it turns out, when it rains hard enough, the water has a lot of velocity coming off the roof, and it can skip out of the gutter.

Next up is the channel drains in my deck. In doing some reading, paint isn’t good for them. I noticed in places the deck paint had completely covered the drainage slits. I used a pressure washer with the narrowest stream to strip the paint off the channel drain.

That was an improvement, but they still didn’t drain well. I picked up a pressure washer drain jetter hose. It is a pressure washer hose with a bullet shaped fitting on the end that shoots water forward and backwards at an angle to help you break up clogs and flush out drains and gutters. It was messy work, but I managed to flush the years of sand and sludge from my deck channel drains.

More improvement, but still not all in the clear. It turns out a root had grown up inside the side of the drain near the rotted door. The channel would move water, but was half full of roots, and didn’t drain as quickly as it should. A lot of work later, I got the roots cleared out.

With gutters clear, paint off the drainage slits, sludge out of the channels, and roots cleared out, it seems like they drain well now. Even if it doesn’t work perfectly every time, this should flood my porch a lot less than it has in the past. I will keep an eye on the water level and check the bottom of that door for cracks. The joys of home ownership.

Maple Closet Shelves

I am starting to mix in house projects and longer term goals along with my shop infrastructure work. We pulled all the built in organizers out of the master closet when we were renovating. It was basic white particleboard and appeared to be rather old. We cleaned up all the walls and installed brackets that supported a continuous closet rod for hanging clothes. This gave both of us ample hanging storage space. The bracket is designed to have a shelf above it. I wanted something nice, and waited until now to build it.

Actually like a lot of my projects I started this a few months back and got side tracked by other house issues. I got the only 10 foot maple boards they had at the local lumber place and went to town planing them.

Buying rough cut wood is a bit like Forrest Gump’s box of chocolates. You never know what you are going to get. In this case, some cool mineral darkening and nice figure.

This is an interesting transition project. I started it with my old Hitachi planer and ended it with my new Dewalt planer. The old planer has been donated to a co-worker that is starting to fill out his shop and could put it to good use.

Goodbye old friend

With the boards cleaned and flattened I needed to work on the edges so I could joint them together in a panel glue up. I preserved the length as long as I could knowing that the ends would eventually get cut down some. Planing a 10 foot board by hand is hard work. I had to employ a helper to keep the board propped up. I haven’t had a power jointer in years, and I don’t see how it would have helped me in this situation.

After much time spent with my #7 jointer I glued the two shelves together and was ready to continue the flattening. This time with the new planer. The main reason I bought this one was because it was reviewed well, and there was an available helical cutter head for it. The two are a match made in heaven. No matter what, the thing produces a clean surface, no tearouts, and the carbide inserts will last a long time.

There is some really pretty figure in the wood. Another advantage of the new cutter head is that it makes really short shavings. You can see them wizzing around in the first stage of my dust collector window.

After a very minimal amount of sanding and clean up of the ends, I routed a round over on all the exposed edges.

With the boards in their correct shape I applied a coat of boiled linseed oil to protect the wood and give character. These will not see heavy use, so a tougher film finish shouldn’t be needed. The oil really pops out some of the birds eyes and other grain variation.

Unfinished above, oiled below

Once the oil soaked in and dried I installed the shelves. They don’t hold a lot now, but probably will as we collect junk in the future. With all the clothes in place you can barely see them. I almost wish I had used pine instead of this gorgeous wood. Oh well, it should be a good shelf for generations. The next owners certainly can’t say it was made of particle board and falling apart.

Kilt on a Hot Tin Roof

OK, so it is probably steel, but it still has a nice ring to it. The old shed at our new place could use a little love. It is 10 years old and the fasteners that hold the metal roof down appear to be in bad shape. The tops are all rusted and the rubber washer that keeps water out looks rotted. I pulled a few, and luckily none appeared to be rusted below the surface.

The shed seems to have a constant supply of leaves on top. In fact, I think that branch has been up there since before we moved in.

Some of the leaf piles had been there so long they had decomposed into a dirt/compost looking substance. The surface finish of the roof looks really rough in places.

I swept off all the leaves and debris, then gave the roof a pressure wash to clear the rest of the dirt and prep the surface for paint. Before painting I went through and replaced every screw on the roof with a new longer one.

Once all the screws were replaced I sealed everything in with two coats of a siliconized roofing compound. It looked a lot like super thick paint. Putting it on really heavily, a 5 gallon bucket gave me two coats with a little left over.

I spilled over the sides in a few places, but otherwise it all turned out well and looks nice. I hope this buys the roof another 10 years before I have to do anything. I know walking around up there was bending the sheet metal up, so I won’t make a habit. I do need to sweep off the leaves a few times a year though. That should be an easy job with a long broom and a ladder.

Chimney Cover

Home buying is a nerve racking experience. Thrills and surprises await you around every corner. One big one is the home inspection. On something as big as a house there are always items that crop up. You have to decide if they are deal breakers, or if you can take the risk of them being worse than the inspection indicated.

One thing that came up on ours was that the chase cover on the chimney was rusted. It was a surface rust, no emergency, but something to not ignore. A winter break gave me the time, and cooler weather, to get up there and do something about it while not dying of heat stroke. Close inspection revealed that it wasn’t bad and some cleanup plus paint would add many more years of life.

The big square chimney cover bridges the gap between the chimney pipe (might not be the right term) and the wooden structure sicking out of the house. My plan was to take it off, bring it to ground level and do all the paint work. The trick was I couldn’t figure out how to get that top little set of square covers off. I tried rotating the assembly but was worried something in the wall would come apart. 10 minutes of googling while on the roof didn’t give me a good answer.

Chimneys are completely new to me, so I am just feeling my way through all this. The section of roof is pretty tame so I took a grinder up there and did everything on the roof.

Sure enough, the rust wasn’t that deep. I knocked it, and as much other crud off as a I could with a wire wheel and came back with a coarse sander pad. There is still a lot of zinc left, but I had read a self etching primer would bond well with it. A few coats of that, and It was way too hot to keep working.

I came back the next day, sanded the primer and used a full can of high temperature white enamel. Even early in the morning the metal was getting hot and the paint dried too quickly. It isn’t a great paint job, but looks fine from down below. The original plan was to do this all on the ground in the shade. If I had known from the get go I was going to be working on the roof I might have opted to brush on something instead.

I replaced the rusted screw hardware with epoxy coated torx head screws. There is a thin band of metal that covers the gap between the pipe and the newly painted cover. The old one was pretty rusted, but a local fireplace store had new ones, so I replaced it. Not my finest repair overall, but it won’t be rusting through any time soon. When this needs work again I might be calling a fireplace expert of some sort.

The Great Cat Door Conspiracy

Great is maybe overselling it a bit. And does it count as a conspiracy if I have been openly talking about doing this for months? The Moderately Interesting Cat Door Plan just doesn’t sound as good. Here is the situation. The previous owners of our house had cats. They adored these cats and gave them reign of much of the house. As such there are a number of cat doors around. Some are internal doors, some go from inside to outside (AC leaks!). On top of that there are two exterior doors that had intercoms. The intercoms are dead and gone which leaves a hole to fill.

This was an example from an outdoor closet that housed a set of litter boxes. All doors had the same size and shape of hole. To fill it I got a wide board of PVC wood. It has a smooth side and a textured side that looks like wood grain. I am not sure how they make it, but the inside isn’t as dense as a PVC pipe. It has a closed cell foam kind of interior. Not structural strength, but good enough for trim and jobs like this. They probably have a reasonable insulation value too, which is handy for the exterior door.

I cut out a few blanks and got to carving away on the router. I was having so much fun working in the shop I forgot to take pictures.

I used a wide router bit to rabbet around the edges so the blocks would fit inside the door and leave less than 1/4″ showing. That made them less obtrusive visually. The inside doors have a wood texture, so I put that side showing out and matched the grain orientation. The outside doors are smooth. Before installing I used my corner radius jigs to add a little round over to the 4 corners. I used white calking to glue each one in place and cover up any edge seams. Blue tape kept them in place while that dried.


With all the cat doors taken care of I used what I learned to attack the outdoor intercoms. I didn’t think a round over would look nice here, but did take advantage of the wood grain. Same trick as before with some careful adjustment to get these to press fit in. I used a small amount of clear silicon to hole them in place in case I needed to pry them out for some reason. The side garage door is bare but has wiring for a future doorbell. The front door has one of those new fangled video doorbells.

Hidden TV

Things are continuing to come together at our new house. I have my workout area setup in my office and have been getting back into the kettlebell routine. There is one thing missing though. About the only time I watch TV is when I am working out. Our only TV doesn’t live in my office, so I wanted to stash one out of the way but within easy reach.

Ta Da, TV hidden behind a closet door. Nobody expects it! The sound bar was left over by the previous owners. It just fits inside the door opening and matches the TV perfectly. I cooked up a set of 3D printed brackets to hold the sound bar and mounted them to a 1/2″ sheet of plywood.

A slim TV mount holds the TV tight against the door and with just a tiny gap between it and the sound bar. I mounted everything, hooked up power and AV wires, then wire wrapped the two power cords together to prevent them from getting caught in the door and make it all cleaner. Buying a TV with a roku built in made for one less device and cord to deal with. I was going to paint the plywood, but it is tucked well behind the TV and sound bar, and the closet door is normally closed. I finished it off with a set of printed remote holders that sit just below the TV.

When it is all together and the door is closed you can’t tell what entertainment is lurking beneath!

DIY Ethernet Cabling

I had CAT6 cable pulled through our new house in various strategic locations.  In my master closet there is a set of outlets up high so I can run a POE wireless access point attached to the ceiling at a location that is out of the way, and central to the house.  Another set goes to my office so my 3D printer and office computer can be hard wired to the network.  Everything comes together to a network closet with a paper printer, NAS, and other local devices all wired in.  The result is good wireless coverage everywhere and super fast/reliable connection to important devices.  It did require a large number of custom cables though.

I picked up a few special tools, but by the time I got done, I really only used two.  First, you will need a good set of delicate side cutters like these.  I used crimp on connectors that let the wires pass through, and a strain relief boot.  Start by sliding the boot down the cable.

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I used the side cutters to slit up the side of the jacket, then try to cut the jacket as square as possible. CAT6 has a central + shaped member, cut that away and make sure you have ~2 inches of wire free.  Check for nicks or kinks in the cable.

 

With the wires free, untwist each pair back to the jacket and straighten each pair.  When untwisted, they still have a lot of curl to them (see the blue pair on the left).  To get these straight I pinch each pair between my thumb and forefinger tightly and pull.  A few pulls has them mostly straight and calm.  It may take practice tries to get the hang of it.  Don’t skip this step, it helps everything else.  If they aren’t straightening you need to squeeze harder when you pull.

 

With those pairs all straightened out, arrange them in the proper order.  I use the 568B spec.  Notice the ends are a little wild still?  I could never get the very ends right, I think cutting the cable cold works the copper into a bad shape.  I always cut the last 1/4″ or so, and make sure it is at a bit of an angle.  That gets rid of the curly ends, and helps loading later on.

 

Next, keep the bundled pinched together and pass it into the back of the connector.  This is where some extra length helps.  Enough room for your fingers to hold and get the wires passed through.  Connectors that don’t let you pass the wires through are a million times harder to use in my opinion.  Push it all through, make sure the order is correct, and use the extra wire length to help pull the jacket all the way up.

 

With everything snug and in proper order, clip the ends of the extra cable (those little side cutters again).  Now carefully pull the wires back just enough to get them recessed from the front.  Put them in a crimping tool (The only special tool you really need, and they can be had for reasonable prices) and give a good squeeze.  Slide the boot up and you are done.

 

I bought a connector tester that runs a voltage down every line.  After about 20 connectors I stopped using it.  I could see every wire was in the right order with these connectors and never had a miss.  After a bit of practice each connector only takes about 5 minutes.  A big spool of cable and the connectors on hand means I can make a cable for about 75 cents a cable plus ~ 5 cents a foot.  It makes my network closet neat and tidy and keeps the total cost down.