Surprise Bandsaw Repair

There are few events in life quite as thrilling as having your bandsaw throw a tire. And by thrilling, I mean terrifying! I flipped on my trusty porter cable 14″ saw and instead of a steady hum it had a terrible screech and roar. The top tire (rubber band that goes around the wheel and contacts the cutting band) split and set the blade loose. After 8 years of service, I guess it was time. The bottom tire was still in good shape, and that is where the motor is, so it still managed to drag the blade around inside the tool.

I feel like I switched it off pretty quickly, but I may have been in shock for a few seconds. The time that it did take me was enough for the wild blade to lurch forward and start cutting into the guard just above the top guide bearings. It cut through the metal guard and left a gash a few inches tall. Metal shavings were all over the tape top. The teeth are a heavy set tungsten carbide for ripping, so they are quite capable in soft metals. I did manage to chip a few teeth in the process.

Those blades are expensive enough that I was worried I would have to trash it. Luckily a few missing teeth out of 100 doesn’t appear to make that big of a deal. I opened everything up, pulled the blade out and ordered new parts. The top tire obviously needed replacing, and the new ones were a shiny blue! The bottom one looked worn and yellowed, so I replaced it too.

Last but not least I found the part number for the blade guard and ordered extras just in case. With the guards and throat plate replaced all was right with the world. The horrible screech was returned to its usual purr.

Bandsaw Outfeed Table

I have a project coming up that will require a long resaw cut on my band saw. Resawing is where you sit a board up on its skinny side and cut down the length. I love my bandsaw, but when it comes to doing long work the small table has left me in the lurch. The bandsaw is a tall tool so that most roller type outfeed supports don’t come close to high enough. I am going to add a removable outfeed table to the back end to help with these kinds of scenarios.

I have some phonelic resin covered plywood that makes good slick surfaces for things like this. The resin surface can chip off if hit on the edges though. I made a frame to hold the plywood, protect the edges, and give me a place to bolt too. This could have been done in pine, but I am trying to increase the quality of my infrastructure work, so I went with maple instead. I routed a groove on the router table and used my roundover templates to make the corners match on the plywood insert.

After gluing and pinning it through the side I did a careful trim with a block plane to get the outside frame and inside surface to be perfectly flush. This made fun little corkscrew shaped shavings. Now anything sliding across wouldn’t get caught on a lip or edge, and the sides of the plywood will remain protected. This is another place where hand tools make the job a lot safer and less likely to induce disasters than something with a motor would do.

With the table top complete I needed a support leg to help keep the back end from sagging. Making it screw together let me turn two short pieces of plywood into a longer one, and helped with fine tuning the outfeed level.

A hinge attaches the support leg to the under side of the table top. There was a good place for the bottom of the foot where the bandsaw base meets the cabinet it sits on. This will let the table support a decent amount of weight without sagging.

The bandsaw’s table top has two bolt holes in the back that accept M6 screws. I got some socket head cap screws and bolted the front of the outfeed into the back of the cast iron top. The back support leg keeps the rest of the table top up under load. I finished everything with boiled lineseed oil and wax.

The table is almost exactly the same width as the iron top, but doubles the total length. Now I can resaw a 3ft board without worry about it dropping off the back end. As a bonus, the outfeed table doesn’t interfere with anything behind it when pushed into its resting place. Nor does it interfere with the fence. Basically I will probably never take this off.

Bandsaw Lighting

My drill press lighting scheme worked out really well and I have other tools that could use a helping light.  Enter a few useful items.  1.  Is a pair of car accent headlight strips (7 bucks for the pair and super bright)  2.  Inline switch  3.  12v power supply.  All told, about 20 bucks of stuff.  DSC_0433

I started by zip tying the power brick to the back side of the bandsaw housing.  Make sure all the cables and zip ties are in places that won’t get snagged by wood passing through the bandsaw.

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I used some 3M VHB tape to stick the switch to the front of the machine within easy reach of the tool’s power switch.  VHB tape is a bit pricy, but really good stuff if you need something to stick and stay stuck.

DSC_0435The light strips fit nicely under the top section of the cast band saw structure.  The strips came with some basic double stick foam tape.  For now they are sticking ok, but the cast housing is rather rough, so I expect they will need additional shoring up after a bit of Florida summer gets to them.

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All the lighting wiring comes to this point behind the switch.  I tied the two lights together and connectorized them to the switch.  I used a lot of zip ties to keep all the wires out of the wood aperture, and I think it was pretty successful.

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I had a goose necklight already installed from a while back.  It does an ok job, but with the new lighting strips everything is really nice and bright when working on the bandsaw.


Lighting Test

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No Lights

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LED Strips

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LED Strip with Spot Light