Liquid Inlay Failure

AKA Always read directions carefully

The plan was to make a small sign that said “CUBE sweet CUBE” for a friend/co-worker and myself.  I was going to mill some lettering into a nice piece of wood, and fill the pocket with colored inlay resin.  I will introduce the mill in a post soon.  Until then, I want to share a complete screw up I had.

I started by re-sawing (Cutting in half length wise.  It turns a thick piece of wood into two thinner pieces of wood) a scrap piece of maple.  Some quick sanding got the tops flat and ready to go into the mill.  A 0.063″ mill bit did a great job of removing material where the text will be.  I sprayed both pieces with a quick coat of lacquer to keep the dye from soaking in along the grain.  With the woodworking over, I moved on to filling the text area with a colored epoxy resin.

I taped off the area to be filled with black and mixed up the product.  The inlay filler I used is a resin with dye made by Inlace.  I metered out an ounce of the black resin and put in the proper amount of hardener.  After a good mix I poured it into the “CUBE” letters and let it sit.  There was a bit of shrinkage, but the results seemed ok. Next I switched to the “sweet” area and mix up the red resin with a proper amount of hardener… or so I thought.

It turns out that the black I got was both resin AND dye pre-mixed together.  The red, was just dye.  It is supposed to be added to clear resin.  12 hours later, It is still liquid, and I am sad.  I can’t come up with any good way to wash out the offending dye.  I think this is going to have to be a do-over project.  In retrospect, the lettering is a lot deeper than it needs to be.  A big waste of resin.  Unfortunately this stuff is hard to get.  I can’t find it in town, and no one online carries inlace’s full product line.  I might try to find their clear resin and do it over, or I might try someone else’s epoxy dye that is more attainable.

2 thoughts on “Liquid Inlay Failure

  1. Pingback: Inlay Issues (Part 2) | Kilted Craft Works

  2. Pingback: Inlay Success (almost) | Kilted Craft Works

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