Table Saw Fence

I have had the same fence on my table saw for most of the life of the saw.  It is a bit of plywood and some UHMW plastic.  The plastic has great wear and friction properties, but was never that flat.

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I was looking for phenolic resin faced plywood as a replacement, but was coming up short locally.  It is available at the wood stores in Orlando, but they are far and charge a boat load of money.  I read about using cabinet grade plywood and applying formica to the front.  That is a lot of work, and bubbles could prevent flatness.

Instead I found out my local cabinet shop sells something called “White Liner” plywood.  It is nice birch plywood with a side covered in some kind of hard slick plastic.  It seems pretty durable and is very smooth.  I got a whole sheet for 58 bucks.  Cheaper than the 1/4 sheets the wood stores were selling the phenolic stuff for.

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I cut up 4 inch wide slices and doubled them up with glue to make a thick flat fence.  If the face gets damaged I could probably flip it over and redo the countersinks to keep using it.  I had so much material I made a pile of spares.  These could be used for sacrificial fences or whatever!

The new fence is very square to the table and parallel to the blade.  I have made some cuts with it, and life is good!


With nearly 2/3rd of the sheet left over I needed to get creative.  I use a piece of melamine in my planer to act as a flat surface to bridge the gaps between the fold out tables.  It makes for easier smoother cutting, but the inner particle board is starting to fall apart.

I cut up two pieces and glued them together using my table saw top as a good flat surface to clamp to.  This is thicker than my old one, but the planer can handle up to 6 inch thick boards.  No clue how I would ever get anything that thick into the planer, so I can sacrifice the depth.  A curved bit of plywood on the front acts as a stoping cleat so the sliding surface stays put.

It fits well and ought to stay really flat with the added thickness and quality material.  With a small touch of paste wax my planer has a new lease on life.

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